Coding

HomePostsLifeCoding


Do I Need to Be Good at Math to Code?

Our friends at Skillcrush break it down for you, and the answer is probably not what you think... By virtue of being such a new, quickly growing industry, there are a lot of myths surrounding jobs in tech. These misconceptions are harmful for anyone looking to change careers or get started in a new field, but are especially harmful to women and girls who are consistently told not to pursue careers in math and science. Gross, but true. The good news is that in reality, tech is accessible and creative. Careers in the STEM industry are often perceived as unattainable by people who don’t get excited about doing math all day, or who fear they might not have the specialized knowledge to do high-level equations for a living. And a fear of learning to code (which is a great way into a STEM career) that comes from anxiety around math is everywhere, especially in young women. Here’s the reality: While math and things like website development seem to go hand-in-hand, the actual amount of high-level math needed to work in tech is wildly overblown. But before we dive into the math/code connection: We should really spend some time examining why you might think you’re not good at math. Do you dream of a STEM career, but feel like you aren’t qualified because of your math skills? Does working at NASA sound awesome? Well, your math anxiety might not have any connection whatsoever with your actual ability—in fact, you’re probably fantastic at math and just don’t know it. Science backs this up: A 2017 Science

7 Movies About Tech Geniuses

7 Movies About Tech Geniuses By: Cameron Chapman, Skillcrush Movies about tech geniuses aren’t hard to come by—but they always seem to feature some version of a tech bro in a hoodie (hello, Social Network!). While Zuckerberg and company are undeniably wizards of STEM, we’re more than ready for movies that show the brainpower of girls and women in tech. Here’s a roundup of our favorites (with a few dude geniuses thrown in too—because hey, they’re good movies!). They range from G to PG-13 to movies from last year to 80s classics, so grab some popcorn and enjoy! 1. Hidden Figures (PG) Before there were computer algorithms doing all the calculations for NASA missions, there were human “computers” who did all that math by hand (with multiple people checking and re-checking each calculation before it was used). Hidden Figures shines a light on the fact that a number of those early “computers” were Black women who were nothing short of mathematical geniuses (and by all means, go back to your high school history teachers and ask why you weren’t taught this key fact). Without these Black women’s contributions, the early space flights might never have happened—or could have gone catastrophically wrong. 2. Contact (PG) This 90s throwback stars Jodie Foster as Dr. Eleanor Arroway—a fiercely dedicated scientist who is selected to meet up with extraterrestrials IRL. Not only is the movie completely gripping and the character of Dr. Arroway a total hero, but a real-life female scientist played a critical role in the making of the movie: Ann Druyan—who specializes is communicating about STEM

Black Girls Code Ep. #3: The Girl Who Taught Herself How to Swin

BLACK GIRLS CODE EP #3: The Girl Who Taught Herself How to Swim... BLACK GIRLS CODE: THE SERIES is a unique documentary web series is meant to inspire. The third installment of the Black Girls CODE documentary series centers on the December 3, 2014 robotics workshop held at UC Berkeley in California. Founded by Kimberly Bryant, Black Girls Code is a unique non-profit that introduced young girls of color into the fields of STEM. Support & Join the MOVEMENT OF BLACK GIRLS CODE. They are creating the future pioneers of our generation. Support Black Girls Code @ BlackGirlsCode.com Series directed by Shanice Malakai Johnson MalakaiCreative.com  

Black Girls Code Ep. 2: Miami

BLACK GIRLS CODE SERIES EP #2: Miami BLACK GIRLS CODE: THE SERIES is a unique documentary web series is meant to inspire. This episode focuses on BGC's recent workshop in MIAMI. Founded by Kimberly Bryant, Black Girls Code is a unique non-profit that introduced young girls of color into the fields of STEM. Support & Join the MOVEMENT OF BLACK GIRLS CODE. They are creating the future pioneers of our generation. Support Black Girls Code @ BlackGirlsCode.com Series directed by Shanice Malakai Johnson MalakaiCreative.com